introducing solids
(first tastes)

Starting to think about introducing
your baby to solid foods?

Introducing solids is such an exciting time in your little one’s development, but it can also throw up a lot
of questions for parents! But never fear—we’re here (complete with Alice, our very own infant nutrition
specialist) to answer your questions and take you through the whole kit and caboodle of weaning.
Perhaps you’re in the market for a few tips, tricks and recipes to take you through this next stage?
Great—we’ve got all of that and more. Or maybe you’d prefer something a bit more structured, with step
by step guidance? We’ve got that, too. In fact, we’ve got this whole weaning adventure wrapped up, so
let’s get started.

 

 

signs your baby may be
ready for solids

Is your baby ready to take their first
foodie steps?

Every baby is different, but there are some definite signs to look out for:

sitting upright

sitting upright

Your baby can hold their head up on their own and is able to sit up well, maintaining a sturdy, upright position.

chewing motions

chewing motions

Your baby can make chewing motions. They should be able to move food to the back of their mouth and swallow. Some of that food might be spat out at first, but if they’re ready, they’ll soon to get the gist of what to do.

hand-eye coordination

hand-eye coordination

Your baby has good hand-eye coordination. They should be able to look at food (or whatever else is in their way), grab it and put it in their mouth.

Above all else, trust your gut about this. You know your baby best and you will know when the time is
right. If your baby doesn’t seem interested to begin with, don’t worry. That’s totally normal, so just wait a
couple of days and try again.
Most little ones will be ready to wean at around 6 months old (which is when we recommend you start
them on solids). By this age, a baby’s gut has developed enough to handle solid food without any
problems. But every baby is unique, so take your cues from your little one.

 

signs that don’t necessarily mean your baby is ready include:

wanting more milk

wanting more milk

WALKING AT NIGHT

WALKING AT NIGHT

CHEWING FISTS

CHEWING FISTS

REACHING FOR OTHER PEOPLE’S FOOD

REACHING FOR OTHER PEOPLE’S FOOD

if you feel that your baby is ready
to start but you have no idea
where to begin, start here!
We’ll walk you through it.

ready to try solids

should you introduce
vegetables first?

It’s important to offer a wide range of foods, frequently. Babies have an inherent liking for sweeter foods
so will naturally accept sweeter fruit and vegetables over the more bitter, ‘vegetable-y’ flavours such as
spinach or broccoli (of course some babies will love these from the off—babies are all different). That’s
why it may take a few more attempts for you to get baby used to the less sweet vegetables you’re
offering—don’t be put off from offering these foods at a later time if it’s not a hit the first time around.

It can take up to twelve times to introduce a new
flavour to your baby!

worried about
choking?

Lots of parents worry about this, but remember: knowledge is power.
The NCT provides wonderful Red Cross First Aid courses.